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2 edition of Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers found in the catalog.

Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers

Ann Bartel

Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers

  • 106 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Employees -- Training of -- United States -- Effect of technological innovations on.,
  • Young men -- Employment -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAnn P. Bartel, Nachum Sicherman.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper no. 5107, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 5107.
    ContributionsSicherman, Nachum., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination57, [4] p. :
    Number of Pages57
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22419486M

    There is little doubt that technology has had the most profound effect on altering the tasks that we humans do in our jobs. Economists have long speculated on how technical change affects both the absolute demand for labour as a whole and the relative demands for different types of labour. In recent years, the idea of skill-biased technical change has become the consensus view . Given the rapid advances and the increased reliance on technology, the question of how it is changing work and employment is highly salient for scholars of organizational psychology and organizational behavior (OP/OB). This article attempts to interpret the progress, direction, and purpose of current research on the effects of technology on work and organizations. After a Cited by: Research Question 1: What are the basic issues in secondary education that affect skill acquisition. Table 1. Basic education factors that affect the acquisition of OTM skills S/N O Item Statement SA A D SD U X SD Decision 1 Students do not do practical keyboarding in secondary schools 36 35 6 2 1 AcceptedFile Size: KB.   We apply an understanding of what computers do - the execution of procedural or rules-based logic - to study how computer technology alters job skill demands. We contend that computer capital (1) substitutes for a limited and well-defined set of human activities, those involving routine (repetitive) cognitive and manual tasks; and (2 Pages:


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Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers by Ann Bartel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers. [Ann Bartel; Nachum Sicherman; National Bureau of Economic Research.].

NBER Program(s):Labor Studies. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and six proxies for industry rates of technological change, we study the impact of technological change on skill accumulation among young male workers in the manufacturing sector during the time period through Bartel, Ann P & Sicherman, Nachum, "Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University.

Downloadable. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and six proxies for industry rates of technological change, we study the impact of technological change on skill accumulation among young male workers in the manufacturing sector during the time period through Production workers in manufacturing industries with higher rates of.

Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers Ann P. Bartel, Columbia University and National Bureau of Economic Research Nachum Sicherman, Columbia University and National Bureau of Economic Research Since technological change influences the rate at which human capital.

Technological Change and The Skill Acquisition of Young Workers. by: Ann P. Bartel and Nachum Sicherman Columbia University and NBER November This research was supported by a grant from the Office of Economic Research of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, NLS Small Purchase Order Program.

Get this from a library. Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers. [Ann Bartel; Nachum Sicherman; United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics.]. Disaggregating the group, we find that, at higher rates of technological change, the lower-skilled nonproduction workers, that is, clerical and unskilled workers, receive significantly more training compared with the more highly skilled non- production workers, such as professionals, technical employees, manag- ers, and sales workers.

The Impact of Technological Change on Older Workers: Evidence from Data on Computer Use Leora Friedberg. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in May NBER Program(s):Children, Labor Studies, Public Economics. New technologies like computers alter skill requirements.

MacDonaldIt is no secret that advances in technology can greatly impact the value of workers' skills. Older workers often find the updating of complex technology uneconomic, while younger workers acquire and readily employ skills tailored to the newest technology.

The result: the latter group's productivity rises, diminishing the value of output produced by their older. This book discusses skill formation, upskilling of workers, and their interaction with technological change in Gulf countries. Heavy dependence on oil, the 'Dutch Disease', and the high incidence.

previous studies provide evidence for the negative impact of technological change on the careers of older workers.4 Under the implicit assumption of most studies that similarly educated workers are substitutes, it appears intuitive that young workers are better in coping with the changing demand for skills than older workers.

the absence of technological change, the relative wage of high-skilled workers varies directly with their relative supply. Despite some problems of identification, Autor, Katz, and Krueger () argue that a consensus estimate for j is a value aroundwhen the two skill groups are college-File Size: KB.

THE SKILL CONTENT OF RECENT TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE: AN EMPIRICAL EXPLORATION* FRANKLEVY E We applyan understanding of what computers do to study howcomputerization alters job skill demands.

We argue that computer capital (1) substitutes for workers in performing cognitive and manual. 4) As skill demands change continuously, training for workers to keep up with new skill requirements is crucial.

This requires offering better incentives for workers and firms to -skill re and up-skill. It also means using the possibilities of new technologies to adapt new job tasks to the skills sets of incumbent workers.

At the sameFile Size: KB. technological change and globalisation, while making sure that the risks are not borne disproportionately by workers in the form of low pay, precariousness and poor working conditions.

Re-think social security systems to minimise the chances of people slipping through the holesFile Size: KB. Introduction Muchquantitativeandcase-studyevidencedocumentsastrongassociationbetweentheadoptionof computersandcomputer-basedtechnologiesandtheincreaseduseofcollege.

continuous innovation based on distributed software. In such a society, workers must change rapidly. They must be assisted by appropriate technology, such as computers and hand-helds, together with the software and net ware required to make these connectively useful.

2) Background of the StudyFile Size: KB. The Skill Content Of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration Article (PDF Available) in Quarterly Journal of Economics (Nov) February. the educational credentials of workers performing those jobs, we believe our study supplies a missing conceptual and empirical link in the economic literature on technical change and skill demand.

Our analysis provides four main pieces of evidence support ing our model. 1) Commencing in the s, labor input of routine cognitive. The Job Polarization approach consciously attempts to build on what they refer to as the canonical model of skill-biased technological change (SBTC), based on two types of workers, college and non-college, that has been used to explain the wage inequality of.

"Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, October (with Nachum Sicherman). Reprinted in Recent Developments in the Economics of Training, Edward Elgar Publishing, "Technological Change and Wages: An Inter-Industry Analysis,".

Skill-Biased Technical Change1 Giovanni L. Violante New York University, and CEPR Abstract Skill-Biased Technical Change is a shift in the production technology that favors skilled over unskilled labor by increasing its relative productivity and, therefore, its relative demand.

Traditionally, technical change is viewed as Size: KB. the phenomena of skill-biased technological change and skill-enhancing technology import, both leading to increasing the employment gap between skilled and unskilled workers.

In particular, strong evidence of a relative skill bias emerges: both domestic and imported. 1 The Skill-Bias of Technological Change and the Evolution of the Skill Evidence on the Skill Bias of Technological Change the supply of skilled workers relative to unskilled workers has also increased, making the rise in the skill premium a.

• The more educated and employed workers tend to score higher on measures of grit, decision-making, agreeableness, and extroversion. • Socioemotional skills are associated with an increase in average daily earnings, in particular for women, young workers, less-educated workers, and those employed in the service : Pablo Ariel Acosta, Takiko Igarashi, Rosechin Tomes Olfindo, Jan J.

Rutkowski. Technological change affects more than productivity, employment, and income inequality. It also creates opportunities for changes in the nature of work itself. Numerous ethnographic studies have shown how a variety of new technologies have altered the way work is performed, the roles that workers play in a firm’s division of labor, and the.

economic viability for tomorrow's workers, as well as strengthening teaching and helping schools change (Davis and Tearle, ; Lemke and Coughlin, ; cited by Yusuf, ).

In a rapidly changing world, basic education is essential for an individual be. Some economists have found that technological change is "skill-biased," increasing demand for highly skilled workers and contributing to the growing gap in wages between college-educated workers and those with less education.

However, other studies of workplace skill demands have reached different conclusions. SELF-EFFICACY AND COMPUTER SKILL ACQUISITION. High-tech workers use technology to both solve problems and create opportunities to promote an organization's competitive advantage. Rapid and radical technological changes, however, can deteriorate the sense of efficacy in even the most proficient workers (Hill et al., ).

Thus early twentieth century technological change was unskill-biased at the factory ⁄oor level but skill-biased on aggregate. The –ndings suggest that the "hollowing out" in the skill distribution that has been found for the recent computerization era is not a new phenomenon.

Key Words: Technological change, skill bias, wage di⁄erentials. The next 10 years in global employment will bring dramatic technological change, expanding health care needs, unforeseeable energy demands Author: Katherine Reynolds Lewis.

Technical change and the structure of employment and wages: a survey of the microeconometric evidence. Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers. Journal of Labor Economics 16(4): Google Scholar Cross Ref; Bartel, A., and N.

Sicherman. Technological change and wages: An inter-industry analysis. Despite the larger supply of educated workers, returns to investments in education have increased since 4 Returns to education are especially high when technology is changing—people with higher human capital adapt faster to technological change.

Indeed, a worker’s future success depends on working with machines, not fearing them. Technological Change and Skill Development: The case of Sudan Dr. Samia Satti Osman Mohamed Nour 1 (Maastricht, Decem ) Abstract (English Abstract) This research discusses the need for skill development and interaction with technological change in Sudan.

How can a company afford to pay its workers for productivity gains. Examples of alliteration in the book hatchet capital 'Technological change and the skill acquisition of young workers. Focusing on skill acquisition in youth jobs, the results of this study show that working as a youth can be beneficial to future work and earnings due to both the skills acquired in the youth job as well as the amount of time spent working and acquiring : Kyrstin Shadle.

technological change by preparing workers for alternative employment. Increase recognition of the importance of synchronizing national skills development policies with policies on technology, trade and the Size: 1MB.

A rich and rigorous literature in labor economics has, however, drawn attention to the confluence of three primary forces.

A first is rapid and ongoing skill-biased technological change in the U.S. and other advanced countries, which has generally raised demand for highly-educated workers and reduced demand for non-college workers. Economists who study rising inequality, like my Harvard colleagues Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F.

Katz, attribute a large share of it to skill-biased technological change — the tendency for. increased strongly from the late s onwards. Skill-biased technological change, trade with unskilled-abundant countries and changes in the (domestic) supply of skilled workers have been proposed as explanatory factors.

By the method of eliminating the impossible, skill-biased technological change is argued to be the dominant explanation.ningjobsnarrowlyandmakingeachjobeasytolearn, btainedincreasedproductivitythroughspecializationand.1. Introduction. The effect of technological change on skill demand is a key issue for modern-day economists.

Recent increases in wage inequality in the U.S. and elsewhere since the s fostered the belief that technological change is inherently skill-biased, favoring skilled labor over unskilled labor by increasing its relative productivity and, therefore, its relative by: